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April 15, 2014
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The Greatest Goal-Scoring Season in NHL History



Pavel Bure

What is the single greatest goal-scoring season in NHL history?

Is it Wayne Gretzky's record 92 goals in 1982? What about Brett Hull's 86 in 1991? Or Mario Lemieux's miraculous 69 in 60 during the Golden Year of 1993? All three are worthy contenders, as are the likes of Mike Bossy, Phil Esposito, Cam Neely, Maurice Richard, and Teemu Selanne. And even though they never cracked 50, Bobby Orr and Paul Coffey deserve consideration. However, for my money, the most remarkable individual goal-scoring season in NHL history belongs to a Florida Panther.

That's right.

Florida, famous for dead rats and moribund offenses, witnessed the single greatest goal-scoring performance ever when Pavel Bure blitzed the league for 59 in 2001. While usually remembered for his glory days with the Vancouver Canucks, Bure spent parts of four seasons with the Cats, recording two 50-goal campaigns and totaling 152 goals in 223 contests. His Sunshine State exploits should be celebrated. Start pouring.

Bure made his NHL debut with the Canucks on November 5, 1991, striking like a bolt from heaven and wrecking defenses with his breathtaking speed and creativity. Despite dazzling most every shift, his career actually got off to a slow start. He produced just four goals and an assist in his first 13 contests, and he had a mere six goals and 12 points after 27 games. But the young Russian winger eventually found his touch, ringing up 22 goals and 32 points over the season's final 23 games. Even though he missed the start of his rookie season due to legal squabbles with the Soviet Ice Hockey Federation, Bure still led the Canucks with 34 goals, three more than team captain Trevor Linden.

Over his seven seasons in Vancouver, Bure recorded 254 goals and averaged 0.59 goals per contest. He authored seasons of 60, 60, and 51, joining Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux, Brett Hull, Phil Esposito, Mike Bossy, Jari Kurri, and Steve Yzerman as the only players to ever record multiple 60-goal seasons. Bure retired with 437 goals in 702 games, his career 0.623 goals-per-game average ranking behind only Bossy (0.762) and Lemieux (0.754).

So if Bure was a goal-scoring machine his entire career, why is his 2001 season with the Panthers unique? How can one consider his 59 goals that year to be the greatest individual goal-scoring achievement in NHL history when guys like Gretzky, Hull, and Lemieux had far more impressive raw numbers? 

Answer: degree of difficulty.

Bure flew solo in Florida. When he scored 59 goals and 92 points in 2001, Bure's next highest-scoring teammate was Viktor Kozlov, who checked in with 14 goals and 37 points. Kick that one around the ol’ gulliver a moment. Bure had 45 more goals than his closest teammate. The next four Panthers -- Kozlov (14), Mike Sillinger (13), Marcus Nilson (12), and Rob Niedermayer (12) -- had 51 goals combined.

In fairness, Kozlov played only 51 games. But even if you project his per-game averages over 82, he still would have ended with approximately 23 goals and 60 points. Hardly All-Star numbers. Sillinger and Ray Whitney also could have flirted with 20 had they not been traded; both projected to 19 goals. Then again, Sillinger went to Ottawa and finished with 16 total, and an injured Whitney failed to find the net in his three late-season appearances with the Blue Jackets. But they were traded. Kozlov was injured. No 20-goal scorers.

Bure's 59 goals accounted for 29.5% of the team's total (200), far and away the highest percentage in modern NHL history. One has to venture back to the days of Joe “Phantom” Malone and Newsy Lalonde to find superior percentages. To put Bure’s number in perspective, Gretzky's 92 goals accounted for 22.1% of Edmonton's 1982 total (417), and that was the only time in Gretzky's entire career he scored more than 20% of his team's goals.

Bure led the NHL with 384 shots in 2001; Nilson was second on the club with 141. Bure also played 26:52 per game, the most ever credited to a forward since the NHL began keeping ice time as an official stat. On March 7, 2001, he logged an astounding 40:12 in a 3-3 tie with the Sharks, scoring one goal on eight shots. Bure's heroics couldn't carry the Panthers to more than 22 wins, and the club missed the playoffs by a country mile.

Playing on lousy teams has few benefits, and Bure certainly didn't feast during lopsided losses. He tallied 40 of his 59 when the score was tied or within one goal either way, and he netted only three when the Panthers trailed by three or more goals.

Bure's 2001 showing takes on Herculean proportions when one compares the 2001 Panthers to the supporting casts of the league's other legendary seasons.

THE GREAT ONE
When Gretzky rewrote the record books in 1982, Mark Messier scored 50 goals. Glenn Anderson (38), Jari Kurri (32), and Dave Lumley (32) went over 30. The Oil had three additional 20-goal scorers, including Paul Coffey who bagged 29. Granted, Gretzky elevated his supporting cast, but his supporting cast happened to include four Hall of Famers. Even the Great One wouldn't have been able to lift Florida's dead weight.

With all due respect to Phil Esposito, Gretzky was the most insulated scorer in NHL history. He had nine career 50-goal seasons, and during those years he averaged 5.78 teammates with 20 goals. In five of the nine seasons, Gretzky had at least six 20-goal mates, topping out at seven in 1982, 1983, and 1984.

Also, please remember Gretzky did most of his damage in the post-expansion era from 1981 to 1986, which happened to be six of the seven highest-scoring seasons in NHL history. As a general rule of thumb, reduce all early 1980s numbers by one-third to understand them in a modern context. The league averaged an ungodly 8.03 goals per game in 1982, making it the second-highest scoring season in history (1944, 8.17). By 2001, that average had fallen to 5.51 goals per game. Place his totals in 1982 terms, and Bure's 59 goals would equate to 76 over 80 games. Meanwhile, Kozlov's 14 goals would bump to 18. The 82 Oilers equivalent would be Gretzky followed immediately in scoring by Dave Hunter, Brett Callighen, and Dave Semenko.

THE GREATEST ONE
Mario Lemieux's 1993 season should be revered for more than just the 69 goals in 60 games. Rob Niedermayer and crew are awful, but they're not cancer bad. What Lemieux accomplished that season should be in a separate category far from mortal men. Yet any comparisons between the 1993 Penguins and the 2001 Panthers are laughable. Even without Lemieux for 24 games, the Penguins ran away with the President's Trophy, collecting 56 wins and 119 points in quest for a third consecutive Stanley Cup. Kevin Stevens (55), Rick Tocchet (48), Jaromir Jagr (34), and Joey Mullen (33) combined for 170 goals, or 29 more than all 2001 Panthers not named Bure. The Pens also got 20-goal seasons from Shawn McEachern (28), Ron Francis (24), and Larry Murphy (22). This was easily the best supporting cast of Lemieux's career in terms of top-end scoring talent, although the third and fourth lines were nonexistent.

Like Gretzky, Lemieux could turn even average players into consistent goal-scorers, so his playmaking created the illusion of support where none existed. Stiffs like Warren Young, Dan Quinn, and Rob Brown all posted 40-goal seasons skating with Lemieux. Randy Cunneyworth -- yes, that Randy Cunneyworth -- scored 35. Lemieux's greatness prevented him from ever matching Bure's solitary scoring dominance, because he made everyone around him a goal-scorer. Lemieux's career-high in goals came in 1989 when he clocked 85 playing with Paul Coffey and little else. But even then, Lemieux's production accounted for just 24.5% of the team's overall total. And once the 1990s rolled around, Lemieux had stacked supporting casts on par with what Gretzky enjoyed during the early 1980s.

GOLDEN BRETT
Brett Hull's 86 goals in 1991 lapped his nearest St. Louis teammate by a record 59 tallies. Geoff Courtnall ranked second that year with 27, joining Adam Oates (25) as the team's only other 20-goal scorers. One of the game's premier playmaking centers, Oates collected 90 assists next to Hull. There is no 86-goal season without Oates. And as limited as they were, the 91 Blues still provided Hull six other players with at least 14 goals or 37 points, meaning Hull's 86 goals were only 27.7% of the team's overall total (310).

Hull notched 72 goals in 1990, but he had a much stronger supporting cast, with Paul MacLean chipping in 34 goals and four other Blues eclipsing 20. Hull's scoring binge continued in 1992 with another 70-goal effort, and this time Brendan Shanahan rode shotgun with 33 goals while Nelson Emerson (23), Jeff Brown (20), and Dave Christian (20) all hit 20. Hull's five-year string of dominance concluded with 54 goals in 1993 and 57 in 1994. Shanahan kept pace both times, scoring 51 and 54, respectively.

GOLDEN JET
His boy may have surpassed him in career goals, but Bobby Hull remains the best left winger who ever lived. Hull the Elder was the first man to post multiple 50-goal seasons, turning the trick five times over an 11-year span. Chicago provided him with 4.60 20-goal scorers, including another all-timer in Stan Mikita. When Hull buried a career-high 58 goals in 1969, the Blackhawks had four other 30-goal scorers plus a pair of 20s. His most remarkable performance actually occurred during his initial 50-goal campaign of 1962. Hull struck 50 on the nose that year to account for 23.0% of the club's offense, while Mikita (25) and Ab McDonald (22) were Chicago's only other 20-goal scorers.

LIKE A BOSS
Aside from being the reigning career goals-per-game king, Mike Bossy shares the title for most 50-goal seasons with Gretzky (9) and holds the mark for most consecutive 50-goal campaigns (9). Of course, Bossy only wears the goals-per-game crown because Lemieux limped around the ice until the age of 40 to save the Pittsburgh franchise, and Bossy also benefitted greatly by playing almost his entire career on stacked teams in the inflated post-expansion era. Regardless, his personal achievements are staggering. Yet Bossy never approached Bure's level of individual dominance.

Bossy always had Bryan Trottier in the middle to help shoulder the load. And even when Trottier missed time, Bossy forged a terrific trio with Brent Sutter and John Tonelli. In six of his nine 50-goal seasons, Bossy had at least one 40-goal teammate. He always had at least three 20-goal teammates and had as many as seven on three different occasions. All told, the Islanders averaged 5.56 20-goal scorers in each of Bossy's 50-goal efforts. The Isles were so loaded that Bossy never once scored more than 20% of the team's goals, falling just shy in 1983 when his 60 goals represented 19.9%.

ESPO
Before Gretzky came along, Phil Esposito owned all the goal-scoring records. His 76 in 1971 made him the first man to break 60 and began a string of five consecutive 50-goal seasons. Those Boston squads of the early 1970s are on the short list of greatest teams ever assembled. Esposito averaged 7.00 20-goal teammates during the stretch, had as many as nine 20-goal mates in 1971, and shared the spotlight with fellow 50-goal men Johnny Bucyk and Ken Hodge. There was also this guy Orr who was pretty, pretty good.

DYNAMIC DEFENSEMEN
Bobby Orr and Paul Coffey are the only two defensemen to ever threaten 50 goals. Orr went for 46 in 1975. Coffey hung 40 in 1984 and a record 48 in 1986. Obviously, scoring 40 from the blue line is spectacular, but each man was a single weapon amongst fearsome arsenals. When he recorded his career-high 46, Orr still finished 16 goals behind Esposito and had a total of six teammates with 20 goals. His 46 tallies represented 13.3% of Boston's 345 team goals. Coffey's 48 accounted for 11.3% of Edmonton's 426 goals, and he had three 50-goal scorers ahead of him in Kurri (68), Anderson (54), and Gretzky (52).

MODERN MARVELS
Alexander Ovechkin and Steven Stamkos deserve mention in any goal-scoring discussion. Ovechkin has topped 50 goals four times, and his career-high 65 in 2008 represented 26.9% of Washington's offense. Skating with two-time scoring champ Martin St. Louis, Stamkos has two 50-goal seasons, including a 60-goal bid in 2012 that equaled 25.5% of Tampa Bay's goal output. And don't overlook what Jarome Iginla accomplished in pre-lockout Calgary. Iggy rifled home 52 goals in 2002, good for 25.9% of his team's offense. All impressive feats to be sure, but none of them touch 01 Bure.

ROCKET V. ROCKET
Maurice "Rocket" Richard had nothing on the Russian Rocket. In terms of individual dominance, Richard's historic 50-goal 1945 season falls far short of Bure's 2001 performance. The Habs boasted four other 20-goal scorers during the 50-game slate, including Richard's linemates Elmer Lach (26) and Toe Blake (29). Lach led the league in assists (54) and points (80), finishing seven points ahead of Rocket. Thanks to the excellent support, Richard's 50 goals were a mere 21.9% of the team's offense. And don't forget, World War II drained the talent pool during the mid-1940s, making it the second-easiest era in which to score goals behind only Gretzky's early 80s heyday.

Richard's 50 in 50 actually sits fourth amongst his most dominant seasons. His 45 goals in 1947 accounted for 23.8% of the team total. In 1951, he scored 42 goals to represent 24.3% of Montreal's offense. And in 1950, Richard notched 43 without another 20-goal scorer on the roster to provide 24.9% of the team's 173 markers.

GOAL CAM
In 1994, a hobbled Cam Neely scored 50 goals in 49 outings, never losing his scoring touch despite rarely playing consecutive games. Like Brett Hull and another fella who will be mentioned later, Neely benefitted from the great Adam Oates, who posted 32 goals and 80 assists. The 94 Bruins also boasted three other 20-goal scorers in Bryan Smolinski (31), Ted Donato (22), and Ray Bourque (20), limiting Neely's 50 goals to 17.3% of the team's offense. Of his three 50-goal seasons, Neely's most dominant effort came in 1990 when his 55 goals accounted for 19.0% of Boston's total (289).

MR. HOCKEY
Due in part to playing 70-game seasons, Gordie Howe never scored 50 goals. He went north of 40 five times, blasting a career-high 49 in 1953. Howe always enjoyed solid supporting casts featuring Ted Lindsay, Sid Abel, Alex Delvecchio, and Frank Mahovlich. With Detroit's scoring spread out, Howe never accounted for more than 22.2% of his team's goals.

BIG BOMBER
Charlie Conacher was the NHL's most fearsome shooter during the 1930s, taking the goal title five times in six years. In 1931, Conacher hammered 31 goals in 37 games. But with the likes of Busher Jackson, Joe Primeau, and Ace Bailey providing cover, Conacher's production went no higher than 26.3% of Toronto's goal total.

Most every other great scorer throughout history had at least one legendary running mate, if not more. Guy Lafleur had Steve Shutt. Marcel Dionne had Charlie Simmer and Dave Taylor. Michel Goulet had Peter Stastny. Alexander Mogilny had Pat LaFontaine. Again, Bure scored 59 without another 20-goal scorer on the roster. Through 2013, the NHL has seen 191 50-goal seasons, and only three other men can match Bure's claim.

FINNISH FLASH
For pure entertainment value, Teemu Selanne's 1992-93 rookie campaign may take the vegan, gluten-free cake. The Finnish Flash made each game an event, barnstorming his way to 76 goals. But he wasn't alone. Even though Selanne had 48 more goals than his nearest teammate, that Winnipeg club had five 20-goal scorers and a 97-point man in Phil Housley. The Jets had eight other players with at least 14 goals and seven players with 37 or more points. No, Selanne's truly spectacular season came years later, far from the wintry wonderland of Manitoba.

By the late 1990s, Selanne had soared to Anaheim and forged an uncanny chemistry with Mighty Duckling Paul Kariya. The duo had combined for 97 goals in 1997, their first full season together, and had big plans for an encore. But a Gary Suter crosscheck to Kariya's jaw changed all that. The resulting concussion limited Kariya to 22 games in 1998 and forced Selanne to go it alone. Without his plucky sidekick, Selanne still managed 52 goals in 73 games. Incredibly, Kariya tied Steve Rucchin for second on the team in goals with 17. Scott Young, who had 13 tallies, was the only other Duck to reach double-digits. Technically, like Bure, Selanne did not have another 20-goal scorer on his roster. And Rucchin's 53 points made him the only other Duck with at least 37 points, although Dmitri Mironov fell just shy with 36.

Still, it's difficult overlooking Kariya's presence, especially since he had 17 goals and 31 points in his 22 games. Oddly enough, Selanne actually scored at a better clip when Kariya was out of the lineup. In his 22 games with Kariya, Selanne scored 15 goals, averaging 0.681 goals per game. In his 51 games without Kariya, Selanne scored 37 times, averaging 0.725 goals per contest.

The 98 Ducks were just as dreadful as the 01 Panthers, mustering 65 points and a whopping 205 goals scored. Selanne's 52 red lights marked 25.4% of the team total. Close. But not quite.

MIGHTY WATER FOWL
Kariya had been all by his lonesome in Anaheim until Selanne arrived towards the end of the 1996 season. The tandem clicked immediately, sparking Kariya to the lone 50-goal season of his career. Rucchin was second in scoring with 19 goals and 44 points. Selanne's 16 goals and 36 points in 28 games ranked third. Yes, technically, Kariya matched Bure in scoring 50 without a 20-goal teammate, and he had only one teammate above 37 points. But Todd Krygier and Mike Sillinger had 37 and 34 points, respectively, and would have surpassed Kozlov's 37-point benchmark had they not been traded. And of course having Selanne around for 28 was a huge advantage over Bure. With Selanne in the lineup, Kariya scored 20 goals and 42 points, good for 0.714 goals per contest. Considering he had been averaging 0.536 goals per game prior to Selanne, Kariya likely doesn't hit 50 without him.

BONZAI
Cut from the same cloth as Bure, Peter Bondra possessed blazing speed and a howitzer off the wing, stockpiling 503 goals in 1081 career games. Bondra had nine 30-goal seasons, maxed out at 52 twice, and led the league in goals twice, the first coming in the lockout-shortened 1995 campaign when he pitched a Cy Young-worthy 34 goals and nine assists in 47 contests.

Bondra's first 52-goal effort came in 1996. Steve Konowalchuk was second on the Capitals with 23 goals, but Keith Jones (18), Pat Peake (17), Michael Pivonka (16), and Sergei Gonchar (15) beat Kozlov's 14-goal standard. Six other Caps conquered Kozlov's 37 points. Pivonka even edged Bondra in scoring, 81-80.

Bondra's legit challenge to Bure came two years later in 1998. The Slovakian sniper again finished with 52 goals, tying Selanne for the league lead. And this time, Washington didn't have another 20-goal scorer on its roster. Adam Oates (18), Richard Zednik (17), and Calle Johansson (15) were the only Caps to post more than 14 goals. Oates was the only other skater to exceed 37 points, but his 76 were just two less than Bondra. Having Oates ends all Bure comparisons. And the 98 Capitals were also a decent team, finishing the regular season with 92 points and making a surprising run to the Stanley Cup Finals.

In the end, 96 Kariya, 98 Bondra, and 98 Selanne are the only three goal-scoring seasons even remotely close to what Bure accomplished in 2001, and they all held significant advantages in supporting casts.

No goal-scorer in NHL history did more with less than Pavel Bure. During his 12-year career, he never once skated a full season with a 40-goal scorer or a 90-point man. And in a lifetime of individual brilliance, Bure's 2001 season stands alone, a towering triumph for the ages.


PERCENTAGE TEAM GOALS: 50-GOAL SEASONS
2001 Pavel Bure - .295
1991 Brett Hull - .277
2008 Alexander Ovechkin - .269
2002 Jarome Iginla - .259
2012 Steven Stamkos - .255
1998 Teemu Selanne - .254
1992 Brett Hull - .251
1989 Mario Lemieux - .245
1990 Brett Hull - .244
2008 Ilya Kovalchuk - .241
2000 Pavel Bure - .238
1998 Peter Bondra - .237
1993 Teemu Selanne - .236
2010 Steven Stamkos - .235
1962 Bobby Hull - .230
1998 Pavel Bure - .228
1993 Alexander Mogilny - .227
1966 Bobby Hull - .225
1996 Peter Bondra - .222
1982 Wayne Gretzky - .221
1945 Maurice Richard - .219
1988 Mario Lemieux - .219
1006 Alexander Ovechkin - .219
1997 Keith Tkachuk - .217
1974 Rick Martin - .215
1990 Steve Yzerman - .215
1994 Pavel Bure - .215
1996 Paul Kariya - .214
1998 John LeClair - .211
2006 Jonathan Cheechoo - .211
2006 Jaromir Jagr - .210
2011 Corey Perry - .209
1989 Steve Yzerman - .208
1997 Teemu Selanne - .208
1969 Bobby Hull - .207
2008 Jarome Iginla - .207
1983 Lanny McDonald - .206
1992 Jeremy Roenick - .206
2007 Vincent Lecavalier - .206
2009 Alexander Ovechkin - .206
1979 Marcel Dionne - .202
1984 Mike Bullard - .201
1972 Phil Esposito - .200
1974 Mickey Redmond - .200
2001 Joe Sakic - .200


PERCENTAGE TEAM GOALS: SIGNIFICANT NON-50-GOAL SEASONS
Jean Beliveau
1956 - 47 (Richard 38, Geoffrion 29) .212

Bill Boucher
1923 - 23 (O. Cleghorn 19) .315

Punch Broadbent
1922 - 32 (Denneny 27) .302

Odie Cleghorn
1919 - 23 (Lalonde 23) .261
1922 - 21 (Boucher 17, S. Cleghorn 17) .239

Charlie Conacher
1931 - 31 (Bailey 23) .263
1932 - 34 (Jackson 28) .219
1935 - 36 (Jackson 22) .229

Cy Denneny
1918 - 36 (Darragh 14) .353
1921 - 34 (Nighbor 18) .351

Babe Dye
1921 - 33 (Noble 20) .314
1922 - 30 (Cameron 19, Denneny 19) .306
1923 - 26 (Adams 19) .317
1925 - 38 (Adams 21) .422

Gordie Howe
1952 - 47 (Lindsay 30, Prystai 21) .219
1953 - 49 (Lindsay 32, Wilson 23) .220
1957 - 44 (Lindsay 30) .222
1969 - 44 (Mahovlich 49) .205

Aurele Joliat
1925 - 29 (Morenz 27) .312

Newsy Lalonde
1919 - 23 (O. Cleghorn 23) .261
1920 - 36 (Arbour 22) .279
1921 - 33 (Mummery 15, Pitre 15) .295

Frank Mahovlich
1961 - 48 (Nevin 21) .205
1969 - 49 (Howe 44, Delvecchio 25, Unger 24, Stemkowski 20) .205

Joe Malone
1917 - 41 (Ritchie 17) .446
1918 - 44 (Lalonde 23) .383
1920 - 39 (Carey 11, McCarthy 11) .429
1921 - 30 (Prodger 18) .326
1922 - 25 (Prodger 15) .284

Howie Morenz
1928 - 33 (Joliat 28, Gagne 20) .284
1930 - 40 (Lepine 24) .282
1931 - 28 (Gagnon 18) .217

Maurice Richard
1947 - 45 (Reay 21) .238
1950 - 47 (Gravelle 19, Reay 19) .250
1951 - 42 (Lach 21) .243

Joe Sakic
1991 - 48 (Sundin 23) .203


GREATEST GOAL DIFFERENTIAL WITH CLOSEST TEAMMATE
1991 Hull 59
1993 Selanne 48
2001 Bure 45
1982 Gretzky 42
2008 Ovechkin 39
1990 Hull 38
1992 Hull 37
1989 Lemieux 36
1998 Selanne 35
2012 Stamkos 35
1998 Bondra 34
1984 Gretzky 33
1981 Bossy 32
1996 Kariya 31
1988 Lemieux 30
1990 Neely 30


FEWEST GOALS CLOSEST TEAMMATE
2001 Bure (Kozlov 14)
1998 Selanne (Kariya 17, Rucchin 17)
1998 Bondra (Oates 18)
1996 Kariya (Rucchin 19)
1998 Bure (Messier 22)
1996 Bondra (Konowalchuk 23)
2006 Ovechkin (Zubrus 23)
1962 Hull (Mikita 25)
1974 Redmond (Charron 25)
1990 Neely (Carpenter 25)


50-GOAL SEASONS: 20-GOAL TEAMMATES
Dave Andreychuk
1993 - 54 (Borschevsky 34, Gilmour 32, Pearson 23, Anderson 22)
1994 - 53 (Clark 46, Gilmour 27)

Glenn Anderson
1984 - 54 (Gretzky 87)
1986 - 54 (Kurri 68)

Wayne Babych
1981 - 54 (Pettersson 37, Sutter 35, Turnbull 34, Federko 31, Zuke 24, Currie 23, Patey 22, Chapman 20, Dunlop 20)

Bill Barber
1976 - 50 (Leach 61)

Brian Bellows
1990 - 55 (Gagner 40, Gartner 34, Modano 29, Broten 23)

Peter Bondra
1996 - 52 (Konowalchuk 23)
1998 - 52 (Oates 18)

Mike Bossy
1978 - 53 (Trottier 46, Gillies 35, Bourne 30, Nystrom 30, Potvin, Harris 22)
1979 - 69 (Trottier 47, Gillies 35, Potvin 31, Bourne 30, Merrick 20)
1980 - 51 (Trottier 42, Kallur 22, Nystrom 21)
1981 - 68 (Kallur 36, Bourne 35, Gillies 33, Trottier 31, Goring 23, Potvin 20, Tonelli 20)
1982 - 64 (Trottier 50, Gillies 38, Tonelli 35, Bourne 27, Potvin 24, Nystrom 22, Sutter 21)
1983 - 60 (Trottier 34, Tonelli 31, Gillies 21, Sutter 21, Bourne 20)
1984 - 51 (Trottier 40, Sutter 34, Gilbert 31, Tonelli 27, Bourne 22, Goring 22, Potvin 22)
1985 - 58 (Sutter 42, Tonelli 42, Trottier 28, Flatley 20)
1986 - 61 (Trottier 37, LaFontaine 30, Sutter 24, Potvin 21, D. Sutter 20, Tonelli 20)

Johnny Bucyk
1971 - 51 (Esposito 76)

Mike Bullard
1984 - 51 (Flockhart 27, Taylor 24, Shedden 22)

Pavel Bure
1993 - 60 (Nedved 38, Linden 33, Courtnall, 31, Ronning 29, Adams 25, Ward 22)
1994 - 60 (Linden 32, Courtnall 26, Ronning 25)
1998 - 51 (Messier 22)
2000 - 58 (Whitney 29, Parrish 26)
2001 - 59 (Kozlov 14)

Bobby Carpenter
1985 - 53 (Gartner 50, Christian 26, Haworth 23, Stevens 21)

Jimmy Carson
1988 - 55 (Robitaille 53, Nicholls 32, Taylor 26, Fenton 20)

Jonathan Cheechoo
2006 - 56 (Marleau 34, Ekman 21, Thornton 20)

Guy Chouinard
1979 - 50 (MacMillan 37, Vail 35, Pronovost 28, Lalonde 24, Lysiak 23, Plett 23, Houston 20)

Dino Ciccarelli
1982 - 55 (Smith 43, Broten 38, Payne 33, Christoff 26, Palmer 22)
1987 - 52 (MacLellan 32, Bellows 26, Graham 25)

Sidney Crosby
2010 - 51 (Malkin 28, Staal 21, Guerin 21)

Marcel Dionne
1977 - 53 (Williams 35, Goring 30, Murphy 25)
1979 - 59 (Taylor 43, Goring 36, Jensen 23, Simmer 21)
1980 - 53 (Simmer 56)
1981 - 58 (Simmer 56, Taylor 47, Harris 20)
1982 - 50 (Taylor 39, Bozek 33, Fox 30, Murphy 22)
1983 - 56 (Simmer 29, Fox 28, Nicholls 28, Taylor 21)

Phil Esposito
1971 - 76 (Bucyk 51, Hodge 43, Orr 37, McKenzie 31, Sanderson 29, Westfall 25, Stanfield 24, Carleton 22, Cashman 21)
1972 - 66 (Orr 37, Bucyk 32, Walton 28, Sanderson 25, Stanfield 23, Cashman 23, McKenzie 22)
1973 - 55 (Bucyk 40, Hodge 37, Orr 29, Cashman 29, Walton 25, Marcotte 24, Sheppard 24, Stanfield 20)
1974 - 68 (Hodge 50, Orr 32, Bucyk 31, Cashman 30, Marcotte 24)
1975 - 61 (Orr 46, Marcotte 31, Sheppard 30, Bucyk 29, Hodge 23, Schmautz 21)

Sergei Fedorov
1994 - 56 (Sheppard 52, Kozlov 34, Primeau 31, Ciccarelli 28, Yzerman 24)

Theo Fleury
1991 - 51 (Nieuwendyk 45, Makarov 30, MacInnis 28, Roberts 22, Gilmour 20)

Danny Gare
1976 - 50 (Martin 49, Perreault 44, Robert 35, McNabb 24, Ramsay 22, Luce 21)
1980 - 56 (Martin 45, Perreault 40, Seiling 25, Smith 24, McKegney 23, Ramsay 21)

Mike Gartner
1985 - 50 (Carpenter 53)

Bernie Geoffrion
1961 - 50 (Moore 35, Beliveau 32, H. Richard 24)

Michel Goulet
1983 - 57 (P. Stastny 47, M. Stastny 36, A. Stastny 32, Cloutier 28, Paiement 26, Tardif 21)
1984 - 56 (P. Stastny 46, Paiement 39, A. Stastny 25, Hunter 24, McKegney 24, M. Stastny 20, Savard 20)
1985 - 55 (A. Stastny 38, P. Stastny 32, Ashton 27, Paiement 23, Hunter 20)
1986 - 53 (P. Stastny 41, A. Stastny 31, Hunter 28, Ashton 26, Anderson 21)

Danny Grant
1975 - 50 (Dionne 47, Libett 23)

Adam Graves
1994 - 52 (Gartner 28, Messier 26, Leetch 23, Kovalev 23, Tikkanen 22, Nemchinov 22, Larmer 21)

Wayne Gretzky
1980 - 51 (MacDonald 46, Weir 33, Callighan 23, Lumley 20)
1981 - 55 (Kurri 32, Anderson 30, Callighan 25, Messier 23, Hagman 20)
1982 - 92 (Messier 50, Anderson 38, Kurri 32, Lumley 32, Coffey 29, Hughes 24, Hagman 21)
1983 - 71 (Messier 48, Anderson 48, Kurri 45, Limesman 33, Coffey 29, Hughes 25, Huddy 20)
1984 - 87 (Anderson 54, Kurri 52, Coffey 40, Messier 37, Hughes 27, Hunter 22, Lindstrom 22)
1985 - 73 (Kurri 71, Krushelnyski 43, Anderson 42, Coffey 37, Messier 23)
1986 - 52 (Kurri 68)
1987 - 62 (Kurri 54, Messier 37, Anderson 35, Tikkanen 34, MacTavish 20)
1989 - 54 (Nicholls 70)

Vic Hadfield
1972 - 50 (Ratelle 46, Gilbert 43, Park 24, Tkaczuk 24, Fairbairn 22, Rousseau 21)

Dale Hawerchuk
1985 - 53 (MacLean 41, Boschman 32, Mullen 32, Smail 31, Steen 30, Arniel 22, Turnbull 22)

Dany Heatley
2006 - 50 (Alfredsson 43, Fisher 22, Vermette 21, Eaves 20, Schaefer 20)
2007 - 50 (Spezza 34, Alfredsson 29, Fisher 22)

Milan Hejduk
2003 - 50 (Forsberg 29, Sakic 26, Tanguay 26)

Ken Hodge
1974 - 50 (Esposito 58)

Bobby Hull
1962 - 50 (Mikita 25, McDonald 22)
1966 - 54 (Mikita 30, Esposito 27, Wharram 26, Mohns 22, Hay 20)
1967 - 52 (Mikita 35, Wharram 31, D Hull 25, Mohns 25, Esposito 21)
1969 - 58 (Mikita 30, Pappin 30, D. Hull 30, Wharram 30, Martin 23, Mohns 22)
1972 - 50 (D. Hull 30, Pappin 27, Mikita 26, Martin 24, Koroll 22)

Brett Hull
1990 - 72 (MacLean 34, Brind'Amour 26, Zezel 25, Momesso 24, Oates 23)
1991 - 86 (Courtnall 27, Oates 25)
1992 - 70 (Shanahan 33, Emerson 23, Brown 20, Christian 20)
1993 - 54 (Shanahan 51, Brown 25, Janney 24, Miller 24, Emerson 22)
1994 - 57 (Shanahan 54, Miller 23)

Jarome Iginla
2002 - 52 (Conroy 27, McAmmond 21)
2008 - 50 (Langkow 30, Huselius 25)

Jaromir Jagr
1996 - 62 (Lemieux 69)
2001 - 52 (Kovalev 44, Lemieux 35, Lang 32, Straka 27)
2006 - 54 (Prucha 30, Nylander 23, Straka 22)

Paul Kariya
1996 - 50 (Rucchin 19)

Rick Kehoe
1981 - 55 (Gardner 34, Lee 30, Ferguson 25, Schutt 25, Malone 21)

Tim Kerr
1984 - 54 (Propp 39, Poulin 31, Sinisalo 29, Sittler 27, Barber 22)
1985 - 54 (Propp 43, Sinisalo 36, Poulin 30, Craven 26, Carson 20)
1986 - 58 (Propp 40, Sinisalo 39, Poulin 27, Howe 24, Craven 21)
1987 - 58 (Zezel 33, Propp 31, Poulin 25, Tocchet 21)

Ilya Kovalchuk
2006 - 52 (Hossa 39, Savard 28, Kozlov 25, Bondra 21)
2008 - 52 (Hossa 26)

Jari Kurri
1984 - 52 (Gretzky 87)
1985 - 71 (Gretzky 73)
1986 - 68 (Anderson 54, Gretzky 52, Coffey 48, Messier 35, Napier 24, MacTavish 23)
1987 - 54 (Gretzky 62)

Guy Lafleur
1975 - 53 (Lemaire 36, Mahovlich 35, Lambert 32, Shutt 30, Cournoyer 29, Lapointe 28, Wilson 24, Tremblay 21, Savard 20)
1976 - 56 (Shutt 45, Mahovlich 34, Cournoyer 32, Lambert 32, Lapointe 21, Lemaire 20)
1977 - 56 (Shutt 60)
1978 - 60 (Shutt 49, Lemaire 36, Houle 30, Cournoyer 24)
1979 - 52 (Shutt 37, Mondou 31, Tremblay 30, Lambert 26, Lemaire 24, Gainey 20)
1980 - 50 (Larouche 50, Shutt 47, Mondou 30, Lambert 21)

Pat LaFontaine
1990 - 54 (Sutter 33, Wood 24)
1993 - 53 (Mogilny 76)

Pierre Larouche
1976 - 53 (Pronovost 52, Apps 32, Hadfield 30, MacDonald 30, Kehoe 29, Kelly 25)
1980 - 50 (Lafleur 50, Shutt 47, Mondou 30, Lambert 21)

Reggie Leach
1976 - 61 (Barber 50, Clark 30, Dornhoefer 28, Kindrachuk 26, Bridgman 23, MacLeish 22, Saleski 21)
1980 - 50 (Barber 40, Propp 34, MacLeish 31, Holmgren 30, Linseman 22)

Vincent Lecavalier
2007 - 52 (St. Louis 43, Richards 25, Boyle 20)

John LeClair
1996 - 51 (Lindros 47, Brind'Amour 26, Renberg 23, Falloon 22)
1997 - 50 (Lindros 32, Brind'Amour 27, Klatt 24, Renberg 22)
1998 - 51 (Brind'Amour 36, Lindros 30, Gratton 22)

Gary Leeman
1990 - 50 (Marois 39, Damphousse 33, Olczyk 32, Osbourne 23, Franceschetti 21, Iafrate 21)

Mario Lemieux
1987 - 54 (Quinn 28, Cunneyworth 26, Simpson 26)
1988 - 70 (Quinn 40, Cunneyworth 35, Brown 24)
1989 - 85 (Brown 49, Quinn 34, Coffey 30, Errey 26, Cunneyworth 25)
1993 - 69 (Stevens 55, Tocchet 48, Jagr 34, Mullen 33, McEachern 28, Francis 24, Murphy 22)
1996 - 69 (Jagr 62, Nedved 45, Sandstrom 35, Francis 27, Smolinski 24)
1997 - 50 (Jagr 47, Nedved 33, Francis 27)

Hakan Loob
1988 - 50 (Nieuwendyk 51)

Rick MacLeish
1973 - 50 (Flett 43, Clarke 37, Barber 30, Dornhoefer 30, Lonsberry 21)

Evgeni Malkin
2012 - 50 (Neal 40, Kunitz 26, Dupuis 25, Staal 25)

Rick Martin
1974 - 52 (Luce 26, Lorentz 23, Robert 21, Meehan 20, Ramsay 20)
1975 - 52 (Robert 40, Perreault 39, Luce 33, Dudley 31, Gare 31, Ramsay 26, Lorentz 25, McNab 22)

Dennis Maruk
1981 - 50 (Gartner 48, Kelly 26, Walter 24, Pronovost 22, Gustafsson 21)
1982 - 60 (Walter 38, Gartner 35, Carpenter 33, Valentine 30, Gustafsson 26)

Lanny McDonald
1983 - 66 (Nilsson 46, Risebrough 21)

Mark Messier
1982 - 50 (Gretzky 92)

Rick Middleton
1982 - 51 (Pederson 44, McNab 36, Crowder 23, O'Reilly 22, Kasper 20)

Mike Modano
1994 - 50 (Gagner 32, Courtnall 23, McPhee 20)

Alexander Mogilny
1993 - 76 (LaFontaine 53, Andreychuk 29, Sweeney 21, Khymylev 20)
1996 - 55 (Linden 33, Gelinas 30, Courtnall 26, Donning 22)

Joey Mullen
1989- 51 (Nieuwendyk 51, Loob 27, Gilmour 26, Otto 23, Hrdina 22, Hunter 22, Roberts 22)

Cam Neely
1990 - 55 (Carpenter 25, Janney 24, Sweeney 22)
1991 - 51 (Christian 32, Hodge 30, Janney 26, Bourque 21)
1994 - 50 (Oates 32, Smolinski 31, Donato 22, Bourque 20)

Bernie Nicholls
1989 - 70 (Gretzky 54, Robitaille 46, John Tonelli 31, Dave Taylor 26, Mike Krushelnyski 26, Steve Duchesne 25)

Joe Nieuwendyk
1988 - 51 (Loob 50, Bullard 48, Mullen 40, Hull 26, MacInnis 25, Suter 21, Peplinski 20)
1989 - 51 (Mullen 51, Loob 27, Gilmour 26, Otto 23, Hrdina 22, Hunter 22, Roberts 22)

John Ogrodnick
1985 - 55 (Duguay 38, Yzerman 30, Gare 27, Kisio 20)

Alexander Ovechkin
2006 - 52 (Zubrus 23, Clark 20, Pettinger 20)
2008 - 65 (Semin 26, Laich 21)
2009 - 56 (Semin 34, Green 31, Laich 23, Backstrom 22)
2010 - 50 (Semin 40, Backstrom 33, Knuble 29, Laich 25, Fleischmann 23, Fehr 21)

Corey Perry
2011 - 50 (Ryan 34, Selanne 31)

Jean Pronovost
1976 - 52 (Larouche 53)

Mark Recchi
1993 - 53 (Lindros 41, Brind'Amour 37, Dineen 35, Fedyk 21)

Mickey Redmond
1973 - 52 (Dionne 40, Collins 21)
1974 - 51 (Charron 25, Berenson 24, Dionne 24, Libett 24,

Jacques Richard
1981 - 52 (A. Stastny 39, P. Stastny 39, Goulet 32, Ftorek 24, Tardif 23)

Maurice Richard
1945 - 50 (Blake 29, Lach 26, O'Connor 21, Hiller 20)

Stephane Richer
1988 - 50 (Lemieux 31, Smith 27, Naslund 24, McPhee 23, Chelios 20)
1990 - 51 (Corson 31, Courtnall 27, McPhee 23, Naslund 21)

Gary Roberts
1992 - 53 (Fleury 33, Ranheim 23, Makarov 22, Nieuwendyk 22, Reichel 22)

Luc Robitaille
1988 - 53 (Carson 55)
1990 - 52 (Gretzky 40, Tonelli 31, Nicholls 27, Kudelski 23, Duchesne 20)
1993 - 63 (Granato 37, Donnelly 29, Kurri 27, Sandstrom 25, Millen 23)

Jeremy Roenick
1992 - 53 (Larmer 29, Goulet 22)
1993 - 50 (Larmer 35, Goulet 23, Graham 20, Sutter 20)

Joe Sakic
1996 - 51 (Lemieux 39, Kamensky 38, Forsberg 30, Deadmarsh 21, Young 21)
2001 - 54 (Hejduk 41, Forsberg 27, Tanguay 27, Drury 24)

Al Secord
1983 - 54 (Larmer 43, Savard 35, Sutter 31, Preston 25, Lysiak 23)

Teemu Selanne
1993 - 76 (Davydov 28, Tkachuk 28, Zhamnov 25, Steen 20, Shannon 20)
1997 - 51 (Kariya 44)
1998 - 52 (Kariya 17, Rucchin 17)

Brendan Shanahan
1993 - 51 (Hull 54)
1994 - 52 (Hull 57)

Ray Sheppard
1994 - 52 (Fedorov 56)

Steve Shutt
1977 - 60 (Lafleur 56, Lemaire 34, Cournoyer 25, Lapointe 25, Lambert 24, Houle 22, Risebrough 22)

Charlie Simmer
1980 - 56 (Dionne 53, Taylor 37, Murphy 27, Jensen 21, Goring 20)
1981 - 56 (Dionne 58)

Craig Simpson
1988 - 56* (Kurri 43, Gretzky 40, Anderson 38, Messier 37, Tikkanen 23, Krushelnyski 20)
*43 goals with Edmonton

Steven Stamkos
2010 - 51 (St. Louis 29), Lecavalier 24, Downie 22, Malone 21)
2012 - 60 (St. Louis 25, Purcell 24, Lecavalier 22, Malone 20)

Kevin Stevens
1992 - 54 (Lemieux 44, Mullen 42, Recchi 33, Jagr 32, Francis 21, Murphy 21)
1993 - 55 (Lemieux 69)

Blaine Stoughton
1980 - 56 (Rodgers 44, Douglas 33, Howe 24)
1982 - 52 (Sulliman 29, Francis 25, Larouche 25, Meagher 24)

Keith Tkachuk
1996 - 50 (Olczyk 27, Selanne 24, Korolev 22, Zhamnov 22)
1997 - 52 (Gartner 32, Roenick 29)

Bryan Trottier
1982 - 50 (Bossy 64)

Pierre Turgeon
1993 - 58 (King 38, Thomas 37, Hogue 33)

Rick Vaive
1982 - 54 (Derlago 34, Anderson 31, Martin 25)
1983 - 51 (Anderson 31, Ihnacak 28, Poddubny 28, Frycer 25)
1984 - 52 (Derlago 40, Anderson 37)

Steve Yzerman
1988 - 50 (Klima 37, Gallant 34, Probert 29, Ashton 26)
1989 - 65 (Gallant 39, MacLean 36, Barr 27, Klima 25)
1990 - 62 (Gallant 36, Burr 24, Carson 20)
1991 - 51 (Fedorov 31, Carson 21, Burr 20)
1993 - 58 (Ciccarelli 41, Fedorov 34, Ysebaert 34, Sheppard 32, Carson 25)


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